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A Framework for Nation-Centric Classification and Observation of the Internet

Matthias Wählisch, Sebastian Meiling, Thomas C. Schmidt,— 2010

The Internet has matured to a mission-critical infrastructure, and recently attracted much attention at political and legal levels in many countries. Civil actions regarding the Internet infrastructure require a thorough understanding of the national components of the global Internet to foresee possible impacts of regulations and operations at a country-level. In this paper we report on a methodology, tool chain and results for identifying and classifying a 'national Internet'. We argue for the importance to consider individual IP-blocks and quantify the effects of our proposed approach. The methods have been applied to identify a 'German Internet', but are designed general enough to work for most countries, as well.

TitelA Framework for Nation-Centric Classification and Observation of the Internet
VerfasserMatthias Wählisch, Sebastian Meiling, Thomas C. Schmidt,
VerlagProc. of the 6th ACM SIGCOMM International Conference on emerging Networking EXperiments and Technologies (CoNEXT'10). Student Workshop, New York: ACM, December 2010.
ThemaInternet Measurement and Analysis
Datum201012
Quelle/n
Spracheeng
ArtText
BibTeX Code@inproceedings{wms-fncoi-10, author = {Matthias W{\"a}hlisch and Sebastian Meiling and Thomas C. Schmidt}, title = {{A Framework for Nation-Centric Classification and Observation of the Internet}}, booktitle = {Proc. of the 6th ACM SIGCOMM International Conference on emerging Networking EXperiments and Technologies (CoNEXT'10). Student Workshop}, year = {2010}, address = {New York}, month = {December}, publisher = {ACM}, abstract = {The Internet has matured to a mission-critical infrastructure, and recently attracted much attention at political and legal levels in many countries. Civil actions regarding the Internet infrastructure require a thorough understanding of the national components of the global Internet to foresee possible impacts of regulations and operations at a country-level. In this paper we report on a methodology, tool chain and results for identifying and classifying a 'national Internet'. We argue for the importance to consider individual IP-blocks and quantify the effects of our proposed approach. The methods have been applied to identify a 'German Internet', but are designed general enough to work for most countries, as well.}, file = {../papers/wms-fncoi-10.pdf}, theme = {ima} }